Allisonia, TN

I decided that today was just too damned nice to sit indoors. I started my day off at Starbucks then hit the back roads of Tennessee. I was on the hunt for abandoned places and then some in hopes to add to my Forgotten Tennessee travels. I drove down US Hwy 99 and hit Eagleville. From  there I traveled down a road at random until I hit Hwy 31. Turning left onto 31 I spied an oldish cemetery  that had a large stone fence and an entrance with a bronze legend upon it. I hopped out of my car crossed a road and began to shoot.

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As I wandered between the rows of graves stones I purposefully looked for the oldest stones. I didn’t have to look far. Old? No some of these were ancient. Some were so old that their faces were worn smooth and had little if any markings upon them. These oldest grave markers had a strange patina. They looked rusted. Yes, rusted. Later I may post some of the stones in color. But for now I feel Black and White is best. Finishing up my shoot I headed back to the car. I stopped at the entrance and read that the cemetery was a family plot belonging to a family named Riggs. the entire area had been founded on Rigg’s original land of about a 1000 acres.

I drove about 1/8 of a mile and came drove by a roadside general store/garage. I pulled over ran began to shoot the place. I aimed my camera at the sign hanging from a light pole which read Riggsby Bros Garage and Grocery. I had to wonder if there was a relation? Likely there was. I fell in love with this location. I’ve no idea how long it’d been closed down, or if perhaps the grocery was still open. From the sun washed and blistered state of the paint and the wood of the garage door and the style of the signage I guessed the place had gone under more than two decades ago. I spent about 45 mins shooting around and getting a feel of the place. As I said, I loved it.

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I hope you the reader enjoy these shots of Allisonia, TN Unincorporated as much as I enjoyed shooting them. As always if you’d like to purchase a print in this story or in any of my other stories contact me at be sure to check out my Easy shop for prints as well




I’ll give you a part of a story, you must finish it.


When I shoot I’m not necessarily looking to make a pretty picture. No. Rather I want my work to invoke wonder. I want my work to tell you a story. I want my work to fire up the imagination of the viewer to write their own storyline when looking at my work.

People, TFP is great but it has it’s drawbacks…

Lucile Furr
Lucile Furr

What is TFP? TFP stands for Trade for Print. Originally it was a model & photographer and sometimes others coming together to help one another build portfolios and or an Artistic Vision. Today it’s become code for I don’t pay. Which is great if you can do it and if you can deal with the drawbacks.

What drawbacks am I talking about? First off there is the Flake. This is the person(s) who either cancels the night before a shoot, the day of or even worse just never shows up. Unless there is an injury or a death involved this is pretty much a fast track to getting black balled.

The value of the trade may not be the same for all. This happens when a Photographer shoots a model and initially everybody is totally psyched about the shoot and are itching to see a final product! Then the photographer falls off the face of the earth. It happens. Why? Perhaps the cause is that TFP has to take a backseat in to paid work. Maybe the photographer is really slow at post? Perhaps he/she is trying to find a publication that will pick up the shoot? Or perhaps because there is no monetary incentive and though the shoot went well it’s not going to add their portfolio and they’ve decided to catch up on a favorite tv series.

The bait and switch. What is this? It’s when a model who either does not wish to pay or can’t pay does a TFP shoot then later finds their photos have been sold by a photographer to a Stock Photo company. Is this legal? Depending on the Model Release signed you bet it is. It may not be the most moral thing in the world to do, but the model got a free shoot and photos and the photographer can stay in business.

The Casting Couch… yeah, ’nuff said?

What’s the best way to avoid these traps? Do your research. This goes for everyone. Pay. Yes, pay for your shoot. It gives you more control of the shoot. Especially if the shoot is being used to get bring you money. Demand a receipt and make sure there is a contract outlining what the shoot will entail and what happens with the finished work.

Questions or comments? Feel free to contact me below